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Narooma News - Sculpture on the Edge 2016 award recipients announced

His piece The Giving Tree, currently on display in Bermagui opposite Horseshoe Bay, is made out of steel and attached to a rock, reaching over three metres in height and width. 

The announcement was made on Saturday, February 7, at the opening of Sculpture on the Edge, which was attended by a large crowd who almost packed out the Bermagui Community Centre. 

On the evening, Bega Valley Shire Mayor Michael Britten said as winner of the $10,000 acquisitive prize, the Tanja-based artist’s artwork will be installed in Eden after consultation with Mr Moffatt himself and the community. 

“To me, art begins in the eye of the creator and culminates in the eye of the beholder,” Mayor Britten said. 

Festival patron Janet Hawley also spoke at the opening, thanking event manager Jan Ireland for her work and said “the trouble with creative people is that they need an audience”.

“If you are a sculptor, it is really hard to get your work shown,” she said. 

WORK OF BEAUTY: The Giving Tree by Richard Moffatt, winner of the Bega Valley Shire Council Acquisitive Prize for Sculpture on the Edge, is on display in Bermagui.

WORK OF BEAUTY: The Giving Tree by Richard Moffatt, winner of the Bega Valley Shire Council Acquisitive Prize for Sculpture on the Edge, is on display in Bermagui.

Ms Hawley announced the the $5000 Cox Family Prize, which went to David Doyle for his work Bermagui Mob – a group of bounding kangaroos made from steel. 

The Belconnen Arts Centre Exhibition Prize went to Ben Eyles and, in a somewhat curious choice, the ANU Residency Prize went to Tim Barrass for his piece the Fears of City People in the Country – a steel pipe in the grass which emitted sounds. 

While a range of award recipients were announced at the festival’s opening, only one claimed their prize in person – Rebecca Selleck from Canberra who won the South Coast Holiday Park’s encouragement award for her intriguing piece Fenkata/Watering Hole that was partly made using rabbit pelts that were warm to the touch. 

Sculpture on the Edge runs to March 14 in Bermagui with artworks at the town’s Endeavour Point Headland, Dickinson Park as well as in the community centre. 


Glass Central Canberra - Sculpture on the Edge 2016…10032016

The Gang took advantage of a glorious (post)summer’s day to hightail it to Bermagui yesterday for our annual Sculpture on the Edge fix. And what a sweet day it was; sun, sea, lunch and Gulaga with a side serve of sculpture. Perfeck.

In terms of muscle, Sculpture on the Edge is clearly overshadowed by Sculpture by the Sea (now grown into a wondrous behemoth straddling Sydney/Perth/Denmark) and innumerable spin-offs from the same. But it would be a gross disservice to make unfavourable comparisons on that account. SOTE simply doesn’t have the demographic and monetary clout/support that underpins the plethora of prominent, flourishing events and can’t possibly compete with the status game that drives national sculptural pageantry. And it doesn’t seek to. What Sculpture on the Edge does have is of far greater importance; it has heart and zeal and vision (albeit localised.) It’s the classic ‘little engine that could’.

This year marks the 10th anniversary of the event, a decade long&hard haul by initiator and prime mover Jan Ireland and her intrepid band of helpers (entirely voluntary, including Jan herself.) In anyone’s language it’s modestly sponsored (though obviously all due respect to Patrons Phillip Cox and Janet Hawley for stumping up the acquisitive prize and prestigious support from the get-go.) The Bega Valley Shire Council clambered aboard last year with the $10,000 acquisitive public art prize (for how long is not clear) but other awards are arguably less of a cost to the various sponsors than an outlay on a swish pair of new shoes. And $1000 from local juggernaut Bega Cheese comes across as somewhat shy of generous (you can write it off your tax, people!)

This being so, the greatest challenge for SOTE is the ability to attract and sustain a critical mass of entries given (a) the cost, to the artists, of shipping (particularly the large) works to the relative isolation of the Far South Coast and (b) the lure of greater kudos and lucre at the more pumped and aggrandized events. Thankfully for Bermagui those tidal (career)shifts are balanced by a core group of artists (both local and regional NSW/ACT) who do maintain an ongoing involvement, ensuring quality and diversity of the field regardless of number. Consequently SOTE is a little gem of a gig and totally in synch with its setting. (If the Burghers of Bega and Bermagui are looking for more bang, they’re going to have to put up a lot more buck and not necessarily only in prizes; the back-end, ie the organisation of the event, needs to be given, at the very least, some appropriate base funding.)

Anyways, enough of the soap-boxing. We had a lovely day of what never fails to be an entertaining engagement. It was great to see Richard Moffatt back in the swim – and hard to dismiss the wisdom of the judges awarding him the gong. His piece, The Giving Tree, hits a strikingly simpatico chord and can’t fail to be universally popular (apparently towns across the Shire are already squabbling over who should have it!) Congrats to Richard…

Richard Moffat, The Giving Tree

Richard Moffatt, The Giving Tree, steel

Okay, so from here on in we’re not going to show all the works, just the ones we liked the most (which we assure all and sundry is no reflection/judgement whatsoever on any of the pieces left out. We’re merely posting stuff that took our fancy/charmed us personally.)

In the small sculpture show:

Michael Snape’s always cool…

Michael Snape, Bowl 17

Michael Snape, Bowl 17, stainless steel

…we love Jimmy Rix, big time…

Jimmy Rix, First Signs of Spring

Jimmy Rix, First Signs of Spring, steel, copper, paint

…the winner of the Janet Shirley Walker Environmental Award…

Louise Pratt. Temptation

Louise Pratt, Temptation, coal, resin, gold leaf

…cute bird biz…

Linda Davey, Curly Oyster Catchers

Linda Davey, Curly Oyster Catchers, ceramic steel

…and, of course, we’ve gotta love this one (cos Megsie made it!)…

Megan Bottari, Teleo(phonic)morph: Channelling Sal (long distance call)

Megan Bottari, Teleo(phonic)morph: Channelling Sal (long distance call), lost wax cast crystal, found object

…and what’s not to love about Barak Zelig’s work…

Barak Zelig, Big Shot...

Barak Zelig, Big Shot, plastic, metal, fabric

Barak Zelig, Little Betty

Barak Zelig, Little Betty, plastic, metal, fabric

…we can’t resist a pat…

Gunther Kopietz, Howling Dog

Gunther Kopietz, Howling Dog, timber

…and we’re suckers for bunnies…

Victoria Nelson, Reclining Bunny

Victoria Nelson, Reclining Bunny, Carrara marble

…and a weave…

Sharon Stevens, Bower 1,2,3

Sharon Stevens, Bower 1, 2, 3, stainless steel, copper

And then there was the Main Event: the big stuff…

More kanga biz…

Jimmy Rix, Roo Shooter

Jimmy Rix, Roo Shooter, welded corten steel

Jimmy Rix, I Still Call Australia Home

Jimmy Rix, I Still Call Australia Home, welded cortex steel

…and this tickled our fancy (could’ve been entitled Rocky Hall!)…

Rowan Dixon, Stoned Again

Rowan Dixon, Stoned Again, granite, metal

…as did the peculiar…

Sian Watson, Drongo (Sitting)

Sian Watson, Drongo (Sitting), stained fabric, wire, steel, cotton, horse hair

Sian Watson, Drongo, (Standing)

Sian Watson, Drongo (Standing), stained fabric, wire, steel, cotton, horse hair

…the weird…

Steven Harrison, we are such stuff as dreams are made of

Steven Harrison, We are such stuff as dreams are made of, wood, plaster coated with Aquablock

…and the curiously elegant…

Barak Zelig, Shaping the Landscape

Barak Zelig, Shaping the Landscape, steel

Well worth the outing – catch it while you can (and choose your own favourites.)

Wraps up on Monday 14th March (closing event: Community Picnic and Fire Festival from 5-8pm Sunday 13th up on the Endeavour Point Headland


Glass Central Canberra - Sculpture on the Edge 2015… - 24032015

The Gang bestirred ourselves a couple of Tuesdays ago and headed to Bermagui for our annual kultural trifecta – sculpture, fish’n chips and gelati – aka Sculpture on the Edge. We’d managed to miss the skirmish of the opening, courtesy of a clashing commitment, and have to admit we weren’t overburdened by any regret to speak of (we’ve outgrown the pull of the brouhaha, thankfully.) And it’s nice to be able to contemplate the field without the constant interruptive chat.

We did, however, run into Jan Ireland (whose brainchild the event is) so all the requisite boxes were happily ticked. Jan does a fabulous job with SOTE against a torrid tide of village&valley agenda politics and it’s always a relief to see her survive yet another annual offensive. [Jan, we salute you. n(Ed)]

Anyways, the event itself (once up) is always worth the visit. It has everything; the good, the bad(-ish) and the (ever so slightly) ugly. More importantly, it’s also very entertaining.

We’re only going to drop in the works of note/our faves. This is not to be interpreted as any sort of judgement on the rest of the field – just that some artists present near identical work year after year after year after year and while it’s undoubtably good it just doesn’t float our boat anymore. So, we’ll start, it goes without saying, with the winner – Ross Cameron’s Tide Spiral

Ross Cameron

Congrats to Ross. Because, no matter what else, it’s an intelligently considered entry that successfully meets the client’s brief; the client being the Bega Valley Shire Council, the brief being a piece of public art to be acquired for the shire.

Now it’s a fairly common thing for artists, when entering competitions, to bone up on and make work that shoes into the predilections of whosoever happens to be the selected judge – and ordinarily this is a practice we don’t encourage/subscribe to. However in this particular instance it actually makes utter sense. Of the three peeps responsible for adjudicating the BVSC acquisitive prize, only one has professional arts credentials – so he, poor bugger, carried the handicap of two Council reps with scarce to none (…a bit akin to having Bronwyn Bishop and, say, Scott Morrison’s parliamentary secretary on the panel.) It’s hardly surprising that they’ve gone for something familiar and non-threatening. Comfortable, even. And we totally get the shell/ocean reference (looks like a warner) and reject entirely the sotto voce titterings about it resembling poo.

[And here at GCC we have no negative bias whatsoever when it comes to poo, as you are all aware.  Besides, we were far more taken by another descriptive tendered on the day – ‘looks like a fat hippy on a cupcake!’ n(Ed)]

So we reckon that Tide Spiral is a dead set perfect fit for the Valley. And should they decide to place it at the high end of Littleton Gardens it’ll make an incredibly apposite visual segue across from the new Council offices to Woolworths (stylised logo and all.) But it’ll also look appropriate just about anywhere in the shire, really. Totes respect to Ross, he’s clearly caught the essence of the place.

A work we did get a laugh out of was Tony Millard’s This is where we are heading

Tony Millard

This wouldn’t look out of place in Littleton Gardens either, but the Burghers of Bega are unlikely to appreciate its finer points (and no we’re not talking genitalia, which was sadly Ken doll.)

But we digress – we actually started out at the Small Sculpture Show…so, back to the hall…

We have to confess that we’re really not into metal abstract formalism – mon dieu, quel horreur, sacrilège, we hear you cry. Well, get over it. Doesn’t stop us from appreciating the concept, engineering and smith-manship, far from it, but it just rarely does it for us (personally.) It’s always too…overwrought or something, and hard to warm to (unless it’s a Matthew Harding!) But the one piece in SOTE 2015 that we did like was Jen Mallinson’s shift to the wall with Kyuku Landscape…which we somehow managed to miss photographing. Bummer dudes – you’ll just have to take our word for it; quietly arresting in its poetic simplicity. Noice.

At the other end of the range was John Gosch’s Phoenix; 670 recycled spark plugs rendered into a curiously elegant affair…

John Gosch

We don’t usually go for the recycled farmyard tool compilations, but the Phoenix pulled it off. The other works that caught and held our attention were: Stephen Harrison’s Hamlet and Horatio…

Stephen Harrison

…(having a good nag!)

Victoria Nelson’s Mother Earth…

Victoria Nelson

…(shades of Sky Whale?)

Tracey Sarsfield’s strung-out The Departed Horizon…

Tracey Sarsfield

…refreshingly contemporary.

Harrie Fasher’s Beauty (again, sorry, no image – we did take some but they didn’t do her piece justice)

And last but absolutely not least, Darren Mongta’s King Brown…

Darren Mongta

We love Darren’s work big time and, regardless of the judging outcomes on this particular occasion, we reckon it’d be extremely remiss of the BVSC if they didn’t purchase this work for the foyer of their new Civic Centre. At the very least it would signal a genuine interest and support of indigenous culture in our region. Just saying.

We broke for our trad Bermi lunch (with our dear friend Rosa)…

lunch chicks

…before heading up the hill to the main arena.

A persistant problem with SOTE over the years has been the matter of site specificity and scale – and this continues to be the case. So you get a lot of stuff that would look perfectly lovely in somebody’s garden but frankly fail to hold their own in open, naked space.

Anyways, on the upside, the stand-outs were: Suzie Bleach and Andy Townsend’s A Burden…

Suzie Bleach & Andy Townsend

…no surprises here, these guys are the antzpantz when it comes to nuanced articulation.

The Braidwood Central School Students’ The Birds…

Braidwood Central School

…(omigod, we wish we had someone like Suzie and Andy teaching us art when we were kids!!)

Jimmy Rix’s Shy…

Jimmy Rix
…check him out on Google (love his Roo Shooter series!)
Jesse Graham’s dragon duo, Penny Dragon and Vulcor…
  
Jesse Graham
…placement perfect (…we were waiting for Mother of Dragons to make an appearance.)
Thor Beowulf’s Survival Beacon
Thor Beowulf
…appealed on many levels.
But our best-in-show goes to John Ramsey’s Protest Pine…
 John Ramsey
…modest, understated (and another ‘placement perfect’ piece.)
Notwithstanding that this work was an on-message environmental piece – and ironically probably wouldn’t have the conservable longevity required for a public art work – we reckon that if the artist had jumped on the current gross-exploitation-of-Gallipoli bandwagon and named the piece Lone Pine, he’d have had the competition in the bag.
Again, just saying.
Anyhoo, plenty of goodies to make the trip worthwhile.
Have to say, though, we were rather less than charmed by Michael Purdy’s Ned
Michael Purdy
Darlings!!
All giggling aside, you know how much we revere our Neddy. So seeing him reduced to some kind of organ grinder’s monkey left us…almost speechless. Shame job!!
We had to head straight home for a brandy!

Ross Cameron’s sculpture of steel and concrete, Tidal Spiral, was put in place on Sunday, August 2, on the grassed area overlooking the popular beach.

Bega Valley Shire Council’s manager of community, culture and information, Simon Schweitzer, said the sculpture will add to what is already a popular spot for locals and visitors to Merimbula.

“Having public art throughout the shire creates a point of difference, it enhances the feel and attractiveness of areas and encourages use of public spaces,” he said.

“Council commenced its $10,000 acquisitive prize at last year’s Sculpture on the Edge exhibition in Bermagui, and Tidal Spiral will be our second public artwork to enhance the shire’s landscape.

“Last year’s winner, Southern Exuberance by Alan Watt of Tanja, is located on the seafront at Bermagui, and it’s pleasing to see Short Point being enhanced with Mr Cameron’s ocean themed artwork.

“Tidal Spiral has a strong connection to the ocean and coastal life, and Mr Cameron is happy with Short Point being chosen as the stage for his work.

“The Bega Valley Shire Council acquisitive prize is a great showcase for the wealth of artistic talent we have in the area,” Mr Schweitzer said.

Mr Cameron said his work is about “rhythms, wave forms and movement - it’s also about growth, rebirth and the cycle of life”.

“Much of the inspiration for this work is derived from nature - observing plant structure, aquatic life forms, intricate shell formations and the dynamics of wave motion.

“There is also a tactile reference to rock formations and the rusting, corrosive power of the ocean.

“In general my work is eclectic and gathers inspiration from a number of sources, incorporating organic elements derived from nature, the ocean but also is influenced by tribal and ancient megalithic art.

“I work in varied materials including ceramic, terrazzo, resin, stone, steel and bronze.

“This work is constructed from welded steel reinforcing rod, box steel and is rendered in concrete and patinated.

“The work was constructed at my studio in Tanja and took a couple of months to complete and I enjoyed every moment of it.

“The scale presented some challenges - you have to take many factors into consideration once you get over a certain size.

“Engineering comes into play - it has to be structurally sound and support its own weight adequately.

“You also have to consider how it will be moved and how it will stand up over time ... of course time will tell!

“I hope the work will remain at Short Point for some time.

“I want it to complement and add a point of contemplation to that beautiful location.

“I really hope the community come to appreciate the piece and enjoy it being there.”


Narooma News - 5 March, 2014
 

'Protection' made out of tin cans by Congo artist Brett Martin

 

Sculpture on the Edge at Bermagui

Tanja artist Alan Watt has taken out the inaugural $10,000 Bega Valley Shire Council acquisitive prize at this year's Bermagui Sculpture on the Edge.

Winners were announced on Saturday night at the event’s official opening, at which artists mingled and admired various works displayed within the Bermagui Community Centre.

Mr Watt has the honour of being the first recipient of the council’s new three-year acquisitive prize, with his piece, “Southern Experience”, to be included in the council’s public art collection.

He was unfortunately unable to attend the opening due to a prior family commitment.

A highlight of the glittering event was the Welcome to Country, which was described by one of the artists as “very engaging and made a real connection” with the audience.

Speakers on the night included Wendy Teakel, head of the Australia National University’s Sculpture School and event judge, and Bega Valley Shire mayor Bill Taylor.

Ms Teakel spoke about works she admired this year and the emergence of the Far South Coast region as a place for artists and the idea of art defining a community’s cultural existence.

Similarly, Cr Taylor’s address also touched on how art binds the people of a community together through an appreciation of the art itself.

Once again Pambula artist Jen Mallinson has won the $5000 Philip Cox Acquisitive Prize, and her artwork will take up its new home at Mr Cox’s residence just south of Bermagui.

Ms Mallinson was awarded the same prize in 2012 with her piece “After the Rain II”.

Braidwood artists Andy Townsend and Suzie Bleach were thrilled to receive the ANU residency prize for their piece “The Plot Thickens”.

“This prize is very helpful to us,” Mr Townsend said yesterday.

“It means we will not only be working among kindred spirits at the ANU, but it will give us a workshop as we have been working on a slab in a tent ever since our workshop burnt down in August.”

Sculpture on the Edge includes a total of 95 works from 74 artists from Melbourne, Canberra, Wollongong, Yass, Braidwood, Sydney, Carwoola, Jindabyne and locally.

The exhibition runs until March 10 with large sculptural pieces displayed on Endeavour Point Headland and Dickinson Park, with indoor exhibitions of smaller works in the Bermagui Community Centre and a "pop up" show of work by Amanda Stuart at Shop 1/2 Lamont St.
 



 
Bega District News
Melinda Cairns Hack
3 March , 2014

Tanja sculptor claims Edge's $10k
council prize

TANJA artist Alan Watt has taken out the inaugural $10,000 Bega Valley Shire Council acquisitive prize at this year’s Bermagui Sculpture on the Edge.

Winners were announced on Saturday night at the event’s official opening, at which artists mingled and admired various works displayed within the Bermagui Community Centre.

Mr Watt has the honour of being the first recipient of the council’s new three-year acquisitive prize, with his piece, “Southern Experience”, to be included in the council’s public art collection.

He was unfortunately unable to attend the opening due to a prior family commitment.

A highlight of the glittering event was the Welcome to Country, which was described by one of the artists as “very engaging and made a real connection” with the audience.

Speakers on the night included Wendy Teakel, head of the Australia National University’s Sculpture School and event judge, and Bega Valley Shire Mayor Bill Taylor.

Ms Teakel spoke about works she admired this year and the emergence of the Far South Coast region as a place for artists and the idea of art defining a community’s cultural existence.

Similarly, Cr Taylor’s address also touched on how art binds the people of a community together through an appreciation of the art itself.

Once again Pambula artist Jen Mallinson has won the $5000 Philip Cox Acquisitive Prize, and her artwork will take up its new home at Mr Cox’s residence just south of Bermagui.

Ms Mallinson was awarded the same prize in 2012 with her piece “After the Rain II”.

Braidwood artists Andy Townsend and Suzie Bleach were thrilled to receive the ANU residency prize for their piece “The Plot Thickens”.

“This prize is very helpful to us,” Mr Townsend said yesterday.

“It means we will not only be working among kindred spirits at the ANU, but it will give us a workshop as we have been working on a slab in a tent ever since our workshop burnt down in August.”

Sculpture on the Edge includes a total of 95 works from 74 artists from Melbourne, Canberra, Wollongong, Yass, Braidwood, Sydney, Carwoola, Jindabyne and locally.

The exhibition runs until March 10 with large sculptural pieces displayed on Endeavour Point Headland and Dickinson Park, with indoor exhibitions of smaller works in the Bermagui Community Centre and a "pop up" show of work by Amanda Stuart at Shop 1/2 Lamont St.


Bega District News
Melinda Cairns Hack
28 Feb, 2014

Bermagui at cutting edge of sculpture
THE eighth annual Sculpture on the Edge promises some amazing and creative exhibits when it opens in Bermagui on Saturday.

Event manager Jan Ireland said over the next 10 days the local community and visitors will have free access to a unique cultural event spread across several venues.

It also will include a “pop up” show of work by artist Amanda Stuart, featuring a reprisal of “Mongrel Country”, first displayed at the event in 2008.


From the 74 artists taking part in the event, there is a total of 95 exhibits, some containing multiple sculptures.

The artists are from Sydney, Melbourne, Canberra, Wollongong, Yass, Braidwood, Carwoola and Jindabyne as well as locally.

Sculptures will be displayed at Endeavour Point Headland, Shop 1/2 Lamont St, Dickinson Park and Bermagui Community Hall, Bunga St.

An official opening of Sculpture on the Edge will take place at the Bermagui Hall on Saturday at 5.30pm for 6pm.

Ms Ireland expected some of the artists to be at the opening, providing the public with a chance to meet and talk with the sculptors.

A symposium, entitled Sculpture Songlines, to be held at the Murrah Hall on Sunday at 10am, still has places available for anyone interested in attending.

Speakers are Wendy Teakel, head of ANU’s sculpture school; Hannah Quinlivan who recently graduated dux from the ANU School of Art and won three awards at last year’s Sculpture on the Edge - including the Cox prize; Haeli Van Veen, a Canberra-based artist and 2012 ANU graduate; and Michael Purdy who studied landscape architecture at UNSW Sydney and has been described as a musician in sandstone.

To register for the symposium, complete the form on the event’s website at www.sculpturebermagui.org.au or contact Ms Ireland on 6493 3808.

Lunch and morning tea is provided for the registration fee of $35.

This year a record 17 prizes are on offer for sculptors.

The event continues to enjoy the support of patrons Philip Cox and Janet Hawley, who have again provided a $5000 acquisitive prize.

Bega Valley Shire Council is also offering a $10,000 acquisitive prize over three years.

“This will help to attract a wider group of artists, raise our profile and provide a basis for council’s public art collection,” Ms Ireland said.

“And the ANU is once again providing a three-week residency prize at its Sculpture School.”

For the first time, the Belconnen Arts Centre is offering an exhibition prize and there is a $300 Seaview Beach Houses Children's Choice Award and packer’s prize.

“Thanks go to all the businesses, council and individuals who have donated and sponsored the event,” Ms Ireland said.

“We couldn’t do it without you, and similarly, we couldn’t do it without our trusty band of volunteers and the committee.”

As usual children’s involvement in the event is encouraged, with professional sculptors hosting workshops at Bermagui and Cobargo Public Schools and Little Yuin and Bermagui Pre-schools.

A highlight of the event is the fire festival and community picnic, on March 9 from 6pm at Endeavour Point Headland.

This is a popular family night with music by Quaama band Gypsies from Outer Space.

Food from Arincini Bambini will be on sale or those attending are welcome to bring their own picnic.

Ms Ireland said 7500 people visit Bermagui over the 10 days of Sculpture on the Edge, many of them specifically for the event, and often stay in the area for a period of time.

“These visitors are a different demographic and often have more disposable income.

“From a commercial point of view the event is very good for Bermagui and the local area,” Ms Ireland said.

Another popular event for the town, the Bermagui Seaside Fair, coincides with Sculpture on the Edge on March 8, attracting even greater numbers to the town.

The packed program features the traditional Bermagui blessing, street parade, sandcastle competition, fireworks spectacular and a variety of entertainment throughout the day.
 



 

Narooma News
Stan Gorton

13 Mar, 2013

Fire sculptures on the Bermagui headland

THE Bermagui headland on Sunday night was lit by flames as the now traditional fire festival closed Sculpture on the Edge.
 

A community picnic proceeded the lighting of various fire sculptures by Chris Polglase, who together with other local artists oversaw the construction of the wooden structures by students from Bermagui Public School.


His own piece named “Flume” was lit by a chain of sparklers with the lengths of green bamboo popping as it went up in flames sending off a shower of sparks.
 

Tanja artist Yuri Wiedenhofer, assisted by his neighbour Mark Lems, once again outdid himself with his working fire sculpture that was fired with a unique piece of glass-based ceramics inside. The fire sculpture was lit at 11.30am and burned through the night under their close supervision.
 

The external structure complete with metal cone and chimney was titled “Nose Cone (for Major Tom)” as it resembled a space craft. The metal cone fit neatly over the cone-shaped ceramic piece that was fired inside as temperatures reached well over 1000 degrees.
 

Later on Sunday night, Yuri and Mark temporarily lifted off the external metal cone to reveal the red, glowing ceramic underneath. They were going to reveal the piece yesterday once the fire had cooled and it is hoped it can be displayed at next year’s Sculpture on the Edge.
 

Organisers meanwhile were pleased with the entire 10-day event this year. “The weather was definitely on our side this year,” event manager Jan Ireland said yesterday “Everything has gone very well and the sales are looking quite good.”
 

Sculpture on the Edge included a series of 40 large works leading from Horseshoe Bay Beach to the headland and back, while around 50 small sculptures caught the attention of visitors to the Bermagui Community Hall.
 

Ms Ireland said Bob Georgeson’s contemporary video montage exhibition at the Fisherman’s Wharf also went really well.
 

What is Sculpture on the Edge without a bit of controversy, this year provided by Stephen Harrison's “Sea Mine” sculpture on Horseshoe Bay Beach.
 

Some locals apparently thought it was real and almost called emergency services to report a mine washed up on the beach.
 

Back on the headland, Hannah Quinlivan scored a Sculpture on the Edge award trifecta with her piece Enfolding. She was last week named the recipient of the Phillip Cox Acquisitve Prize, meaning Enfolding will soon grace Mr Cox’s local property Thubbul, as well as the Don Moffatt and Cecilia Ng Encouragement Award.

Ms Ireland said she was elated to announce Ms Quinlivan also scored the People’s Choice Award, voted on by visitors to the event over the course of the past 10 days.


Bega District News
Ben Smyth

11 Mar, 2013

Bermagui sculptures shine

A STRIKING “Sun Totem” and a camel made from twisted steel overlooking the sparkling beach were good omens for a bright and hot weekend in Bermagui for Sculpture on the Edge.
 

A breeze caressed Bermagui’s Endeavour Point Headland throughout Saturday, but nothing like last year’s damaging wild winds and incessant rain.
 

“The weather was definitely on our side this year,” event manager Jan Ireland said yesterday. “Everything has gone very well and the sales are looking quite good.”
 

Sculpture on the Edge included a series of 40 large works leading from Horseshoe Bay Beach to the headland and back, while around 50 small sculptures caught the attention of visitors to the Bermagui Community Hall.
 

“This year I think people went to see the small sculptures more than they have in the past,” Ms Ireland said. “There was a very good attendance at the small sculpture exhibition and I heard many people saying they were keen to see the Cambodian Moon Festival display around at the Bermagui Country Club. There were some lovely small sculptures this year, I was very happy with how it all went.”
 

Ms Ireland said Bob Georgeson’s contemporary video montage exhibition at the Fisherman’s Wharf also went really well. “He had lots of visitors - some said they were rather shocked, but mostly they were saying ‘what a fantastic exhibition’.”
 

Back on the headland, Hannah Quinlivan scored a Sculpture on the Edge award trifecta with her piece Enfolding.
 

She was last week named the recipient of the Phillip Cox Acquisitve Prize, meaning Enfolding will soon grace Mr Cox’s local property Thubbul, as well as the Don Moffatt and Cecilia Ng Encouragement Award.
 

Ms Ireland said she was elated to announce Ms Quinlivan also scored the People’s Choice Award, voted on by visitors to the event over the course of the past 10 days. “It’s an exceptional result, we’ve never had that happen before,” Ms Ireland said.
 

Ms Quinlivan was unfortunately not present to collect her prizes as she is currently working at a remote Indigenous community, but Ms Ireland hoped she was able to make it back in time to see the installation.
 

Popular local artist Peter “Beatle” Collins, who won the people’s choice award for small sculptures, “spoke of Hannah in glowing terms”, Ms Ireland said.
 

A fire festival to close the 10-day long celebration of sculpture went off 'spectacularly' on Sunday night. “It was absolutely beautiful – there was a lovely atmosphere,” Ms Ireland said.
 

“Plenty of children were there with their parents to see their small creations they had made during the recent workshops go up in flames. There was also a bit of lightning show in the background – it really was quite spectacular."
 

“The community picnic was a bit staid last year, but this time with the children’s input it was a wonderful night,” she said. “There were warm fuzzies all round.”
 

With the Sculpture on the Edge event coming to a close for another year, organisers still have a busy couple of days ahead of them, carefully packing up the pieces for either their happy buyers or creators.


Sculpture on the Edge event manager Jan Ireland looks over Hannah Quinliven's piece 'Enfolding'
 

Bega District News
08 Mar, 2013

Sculpture on the Edge a real blast

BERMAGUI’S annual Sculpture on the Edge event has been known to court controversy in the past, but not normally a police bomb scare!
 

Event organiser Jan Ireland said a sculpture resembling a sea mine washed up on Horseshoe Bay beach is creating more than its share of excitement and consternation among locals, with police even called out this week to inspect it.
 

Ms Ireland said the attending officer quickly surmised the “mine’s” place among the sculptures and that “concerned citizens” had perhaps overlooked the little bronze bird perched on top of sculptor Stephen Harrison's work, Sea Breeze.
 

Aside from that misplaced enthusiasm, this year’s Sculpture on the Edge is touted as bigger and better than ever before. Large sculpture installations currently adorn the picturesque Endeavour Point Headland, Dickinson Park and Horseshoe Bay beach, while an indoor exhibition of smaller sculptures can be viewed in the Bermagui Community Hall. 


Ms Ireland said the Bermagui Country Club is also hosting a small exhibition of fascinating “all-singing, all-dancing” Cambodian Moon Festival toys kindly lent by artist Victoria Nelson.
 

The final event – a community picnic and fire festival on Endeavour Point Headland - will take place on Sunday.

Food will be available from Arincini Bambini and music will be provided by Gypsies from Outer Space.
 

The quality and diversity of the exhibition is high, including works by nationally and internationally established sculptors as well as emerging local artists.
 

The annual display brings artists and their supporters from around Australia, and visitors are spoiled for choice with what is on offer - also having the opportunity to participate by voting for the People’s Choice Awards throughout the week.
 

Ms Ireland said it will be interesting to see what responses this year’s exhibition receives. History has proved the display to trigger either a variety of either compliments or controversy.
 

“We have had some quiet years, but then we’ve also had the three-quarter size bronze of [former Prime Minister] John Howard in a WW1 digger’s uniform, and a life-size sculpture of a gorilla on a cross, both of which polarised feelings among those who saw them,” she said.

“We don’t set out to be provocative, but we don’t believe in turning pieces away, so the mix is always quite eclectic and fascinating. 
 

“Our visitors tell us the variety of materials, ideas and approaches ensures a surprising and enjoyable experience.”
 

Controversy aside, the event’s popularity is always growing and has also launched some careers. 

Local surfer Peter “Beatle” Collins exhibited one of his stick waves in the forecourt of the Museum of Sydney and took another wave to the Busan Biennale in Korea, by invitation. This is the seventh year the exhibition has been running. 
 

It started with one piece of sculpture as part of the annual Bermagui Seaside Fair - which is also running this weekend.
 

In 2007 there were 19 pieces on display for three days – now it has expanded to a 10-day event featuring a variety of sculptors. 


Prizewinners 2012

Cox Prize (Acquisitive)

$5,000
Jen Mallinson, 'After the Rain ll'


People's Choice Prizes
Horizon Credit Union Large Sculpture Prize

$1,000
Al Phemister, 'Dandelion Series'


Blue Wave Seafood Small Sculpture Prize

$500
John Gosch, 'Sparky'

Bermagui Country Club's Prize for an Emerging Artist
$1,000
Al Phemister, 'Dandelion Series'

Mayor's Prize
$500
Yuri Wiedenhofer, 'Fuse'

Residency at ANU Sculpture School
Peter "Beatle" Collins, 'Wave Out of Water'
 

The Daniel & Adam Iliffe Sculpture Prize
$250
Yamuna, 'Family Conference'

The Triangle Acquisitive Prize for Small Sculpture

$300
Mike St Clair, 'Saturn Moon Bowl'

Don Moffat & Cecilia Ng Sponsorship
for an individual sculptor

$500
Dylan Harris, 'The Oracle'


Bega District News
DEREK SCHWARZ
06 Mar, 2012

Spirits high on sculpture headland

NEITHER the incessant rain nor a freak gust of wind, which damaged one of the drawcard pieces, could dampen the high spirits at the opening of this year’s Sculpture on the Edge.

More than 100 people attended the official opening of the exhibition at Bermagui Community Centre on Friday night, before the most committed made their way up to Dickinson Point for a first glimpse of the artworks – and Yuri Weidenhofer’s fire sculpture - as darkness fell.

The exhibition’s 48 large sculptures, installed between Horseshoe Bay Beach and the headland, and 50 small sculptures at the community centre will remain on display until Sunday.

Their materials range from steel to recycled string, with subject matter including monkeys with televisions, wispy bird colonies, martyred saints and crocodile men.

Some of the artists sure to attract attention are local Peter Collins, whose “Wave out of Water” helped him to win a residency at the Australian National University, Mayor’s Prize recipient Mr Weidenhofer, Emerging Artist prize winner Al Phemister and Jen Mallinson.

Ms Mallinson’s steel sculpture “After the Rain II” won her the Philip Cox Acquisitive Prize, and will take up its new home at Mr Cox’s residence outside Bermagui.

However, the biggest talking point was what happened before the opening, when a strong wind gust blew over internationally acclaimed artist Michael Snape’s “Bowl 18”.

The steel sculpture, depicting a circle of intricate figures with their hands joined, was badly dented.
 
Mr Snape said he considered “packing up and going home”, but changed his mind, and the slightly reshaped bowl is back in its pride of place at the headland’s eastern tip.
 
“If it was a car, I would have taken it to the panel beater for sure,” Mr Snape said. “But the accident gave me a new way of seeing it and I looked at it afresh – it’s funny, but sometimes things can be improved by something like this.

“Sculpture is all about resistance and it’s just another part of dealing with that resistance.

“No matter how much I tried to impose my will on the materials, nature obviously had other ideas.”

Bega Valley Shire Mayor Tony Allen and Bega Valley Regional Gallery curator Megan Bottari both spoke at the opening, applauding the artists and Sculpture on the Edge event manager Jan Ireland.
 
Ms Ireland said she was delighted with the quality and diversity of this year’s exhibition, which includes works by nationally and internationally established sculptors as well as emerging local artists.

Visitors can vote for the People’s Choice Awards throughout the week.
 


ON THE HEADLAND: Sculpture on the Edge event manager Jan Ireland in front of “Wave out of Water” by Bermagui’s Peter "Beatle" Collins.

FIRE SCULPTURE: Tanja artist Yuri Wiedenhoffer gets his fire sculpture going as is tradition at the event launch. Photo by Prem Samira

Narooma News
29 Feb, 2012

Sculpture on the Edge
WITH new works on exhibition from nationally recognized sculptors including Michael Snape, Adam Rish, Philip Spelman, Rae Bolotin and Michael Purdy, the Far South Coast’s premier sculpture exhibition, Sculpture on the Edge, will again be a delight for art lovers.

Opening this Friday, March 2 and running for 10 days until Sunday, March 11, the event will feature large sculptures exhibited on picturesque Endeavour Point, Horseshoe Bay beach and Dickinson Park at Bermagui, as well as an exhibition of small sculptures in the Community Centre.

Greer Taylor, fresh from winning the acquisition prize at Sculpture at Scenic World in the Blue Mountains, will take two days to install her contemporary piece, ‘Vortex’ on the headland, continuing into the opening day, giving the public an opportunity to see a work in progress.
 
Local sculptor and surfer, Peter “Beatle” Collins will exhibit ‘Wave Out of Water’, the latest in his series of large, wave sculptures made from sticks. This work has recently returned to our shores from Korea where it featured at the Busan Biennale.
 
And other established, regional artists including Randall Sinnamon, Mike McGregor, Ulan Murray and Jen Mallison will exhibit alongside locals including Joy Georgeson, Mike St. Clair and Tony Millard.

In an associated event, Trevor Dunbar will have a solo exhibition of his entertaining, pop sculpture, imbued with social commentary, at Shop 7 Art Space at the Fisherman’s Wharf.

Sculpture on the Edge volunteers will man the open garden weekend at international architect, Philip Cox’s coastal, bush retreat, ‘Thubbul’, just south of Bermagui. Visitors will be able explore the landscaped courtyards formed by detached, contemporary bungalows and featuring Philip Cox’s outdoor sculpture collection. The property will be open from 10am to 4.30pm on Saturday, March 10 and Sunday March 11.

The Horizon Credit Union People’s Choice Award for large sculpture and the Blue Wave Seafood People’s Choice Award for small sculpture will be announced at The People’s Picnic on the headland, on Sunday March 11. The general public is invited to come along and get involved in the event wind up from 5.30pm to 8pm with a gourmet sausage sizzle, live music, and fire sculpture.

While Sculpture on the Edge has been partly funded in the past by Government grants, the staging of this year’s event has been totally reliant on the financial support of local business and community members.
 
“The Committee is especially grateful for the continuing support of Horizon Credit Union, who became our principal sponsor four years ago,” says Event Manager, Jan Ireland.

“Bermagui Country Club is also continuing its generous support for the third year running,” she continues, “and we welcome the support of our new sponsors, especially Doctor Jenny Wray from Bermagui Medical Centre, Rosemary and Graham at Blue Wave Seafood, and Christina and Trevor Kennedy from Horse Island”.
 


SCULPTURE ON THE EDGE: Greer Taylor will continue construction of her threaded sculpture installation on the opening day of Sculpture on the Edge.


Narooma News
27 April 2011

Cobargo artist gets ephemeral at Sculpture on the Edge

IN the predawn hours of Saturday, March 5, which was the day after the official opening of Sculpture on the Edge, an unofficial artwork/guerrilla art action was initiated by local artist Rhonda Ayliffe.

Hundreds of small paper boats made from pages of discarded encyclopaedias were released into the causeway of the Bermagui harbour.

Released predawn, the flotilla was collected at low tide to be composted and turned into garden food.

“Only a few people noticed, less would have registered that it was an art work in progress – this is integral to the nature of guerrilla artworks,” Rhonda said.

Rhonda also participated as a speaker in this year’s Sculpture on the Edge symposium, where the theme was ‘Ephemeral v/s Monumental – the changing face of sculpture’.

She gave provocative talk at the symposium on the nature and potentials of ephemeral art.

Her talk, including a brief run-down of some of the points raised, is covered on her blog: (http://rhondaayliffe.blogspot.co m/2011/03/speaking.html)

In August, Rhonda is taking her book-based artworks and ephemeral art interventions north as she has been invited to the Byron Bay Writers Festival as the festival’s artist-in-residence.

Rhonda currently enrolled in Higher Degree Research program with Monash University, where she is undertaking a studio-based MFA/PhD.
 


ORIGAMI BOATS: Bermagui harbour invaded by flotilla of
origami boats – an ephemeral art work by Cobargo artist Rhonda Ayliffe.
 
Narooma News
23 March 2011

The people choose horses at Bermagui’s Sculpture on the Edge

THE votes are in and the people have chosen horses.
The people’s choice award for the large sculptures at this year’s Bermagui’s Sculpture on the Edge event went to the piece entitled “Tribute to a workhorse” by Belinda Villani of Sydney.

The award sponsored by Cursley Financial Services is worth $1000.

For the small sculptures, the people’s choice award went to “Little Horse” by Andy Townsend, Suzie Bleach and Mike McGregor.

The winner of the people’s choice voting prize for a dinner in Bermagui was Caroline Davis of Sydney.
 


WINNING SCULPTURES:
Tanja residents Allan Watt and Penny Amberg at the opening of Bermagui’s Sculpture on the Edge with the people’s choice winner 'Tribute to a workhorse'.
 

Keeping with the horse theme, people's choice winner of the small sculptures was 'Little Horse'.

 
Narooma News
9 March 2011

Sculpture on the Edge at Bermagui overcomes challenges

THE fifth Sculpture on the Edge was not without its challenges with new guidelines banning any digging on the Bermagui headland.
Organiser Jan Ireland said all difficulties were overcome with observers from National Parks and the Bega Valley Shire Council scrutinizing the instillation of the sculptures on Friday.

Only one sculpture, Andy Townsend and Suzy Bleach’s Adaptable Migrant large camel sculpture that won the people’s choice at Bondi’s Sculpture by the Sea, had to be located off the headland near the war memorial as it required deep footings.

The 42 large sculptures on the headland were complimented by another 45 or so small sculptures expertly set up in Bermagui community hall.

The winner of the $5000 Philip Cox Acquisitive Prize was for the second year running Senden Blackwood from Orange, this time with his abstract basalt piece, entitled “Twisted Liquorice”.

World-renowned architect and part-time Bermagui resident Mr Cox himself, joined by artists Marr Grounds, Andy Townsend and Malcolm King, judged the sculptures.

Tanja artist Yuri Wiedenhofer won the Bermagui Country Club emerging artist prize for his fire sculpture, his fourth such sculpture for the event.

This year his fire sculpture was on the headland and was modelled after a koala scat or dropping.


Pambula artist Pambula artist Jen Mallinson was awarded the the Daniel and Adam Iliffe Sculpture Prize for her work “Remnant”, while also receiving the Don Moffatt and Cecilia Ng Sponsorship grant.

And perhaps the best news was that her sculpture has been sold.

“I also met Philip Cox and his partner and he was disappointed to see the sculpture was already sold by the time he got there, so he couldn't acquire it!,” Ms Mallinson said.

The ANU scholarship was awarded to Mike McGregor from Carwoola, and the Triangle Small Sculpture Prize was awarded to Daniel Lafferty.

The symposium on Sunday at Bermagui’s “White House” was also a success with speakers including local artists Andy Townsend, Peter “Beatle” Collins, Rhonda Ayliffe and winner Senden Blackwood.

 


FIRE SCULPTURE: This was the fourth year that Tanja artist Yuri Wiedenhofer created a fire sculpture for the Sculpture on the Edge event and here it’s being checked out by Bermagui youngsters Jaycee, Sharlee and Prem Dharma.


WINNING ARTIST: Pambula artist Jen Mallinson spruces up her
prize-winning sculpture "Remnant" after it was installed on the cliff edge on Friday.

 

Narooma News
29 September 2010

Beatle wins emerging
artist award


LOCAL hero Peter “Beatle” Collins has taken out the Emerging Artist Prize at the inaugural Sculpture at Sawmillers event held on the edge of Sydney Harbour on September 18-19.

His latest stick sculpture "Wave out of Water" was one of many excellent entries in a strong field on display at the beautiful and historic reserve at McMahons Point on Sydney Harbour.

The sculpture was received with tremendous enthusiasm by such luminaries as Stuart Purves of the famous Australian Galleries and sculptor Michael Snape.

Beatle has been selected for the world famous Sculpture by the Sea at Bondi and will be headed for Sydney again at the end of October with his "Bermagui Bombora" sculpture, the winner of a People's Choice Award at this year's Sculpture on the Edge event at Bermagui.

He is also taking with him "Wind on the Wire", which is currently on display at the Bermagui Community Centre.
Beatle would like to thank all the supporters of fundraising efforts for transporting his sculptures to Sydney.

The winners of the “Send Beatle to Sydney” raffle organised by Jan Ireland were:
Jasmine Williams - Il Passagio voucher
Suzette Kendall - Seafood from South Coast Seafood Supplies
Pauleen Harris - Asian Cuisine vouchers
Janine Moran - Meat Tray from Bermagui Meat Supply

Jan on behalf of Sculpture on the Edge said congratulations to all the winners, and a grateful thanks to the generous providers of prizes, as well as a big thank you to all Beatle's supporters who bought tickets.
 


EMERGING WINNER
Bermagui’s Peter “Beatle” Collins with the Governor General Quentin Bryce and Sculpture at Sawmillers coordinator Elsa Atkin in front his “Wave out of Water” sculpture.
 

WINNING PIECE 2010:


The inaugural winner of the Philip Cox acquisitive prize Senden Blackwood and his limestone sculpture "ikara" pictured with organiser Jan Ireland and patron Philip Cox.


ART ON FIRE 2010:
Sculptor Jesse Rasmussen, originally from the US and now Sydney, swings his "Going fishing" fire sculpture at the launch with the other fire sculptures in the background.